04/10/2022

HSSE WORLD

Health, Safety, Security and Environment

Photo of the day: First Aid for burns

9 min read

Burns and scalds are damage to the skin usually caused by heat. Both are treated in the same way. A burn is caused by dry heat by an iron or fire, for example. A scald is caused by something wet, such as hot water or steam. Burns can be very painful and may cause:

  • red or peeling skin
  • blisters
  • swelling
  • white or charred skin

The amount of pain you feel is not always related to how serious the burn is. Even a very serious burn may be relatively painless. So our photo of today you will be familiar with :

  • Type of burns
  • Treating burns and First aid for burns
  • When to go to hospital
  • Electrical burns
  • Acid and chemical burns
  • Sunburn

Also, Read Photo of the day: Tips to reduce Heat stress in the workplace

First Aid for burn

Types of burn

Burns are assessed by how seriously your skin is damaged and which layers of skin are affected.

Your skin has 3 layers:

  • the epidermis – the outer layer of skin
  • the dermis – the layer of tissue just beneath, which contains blood capillaries, nerve endings, sweat glands, and hair follicles
  • the subcutaneous fat, or subcutis – the deeper layer of fat and tissue

There are 4 main types of burn, which tend to have different appearances and different symptoms:

  • superficial epidermal burn – where the epidermis is damaged; your skin will be red, slightly swollen, and painful, but not blistered
  • superficial dermal burn – where the epidermis and part of the dermis are damaged; your skin will be pale pink and painful, and there may be small blisters
  • deep dermal or partial thickness burn – where the epidermis and the dermis are damaged; this type of burn makes your skin turn red and blotchy; your skin may be dry or moist and become swollen and blistered, and it may be very painful or painless
  • full-thickness burn – where all 3 layers of skin (the epidermis, dermis, and subcutis) are damaged; the skin is often burnt away and the tissue underneath may appear pale or blackened, while the remaining skin will be dry and white, brown or black with no blisters. The texture of the skin may also be leathery or waxy. It may also be painless

Also Read: Photo of the day: Safe Lifting at work

Treating burns and First aid for burns

Appropriate first aid must be used to treat any burns or scalds as soon as possible. This will limit the amount of damage to your skin. You can apply the following first aid techniques to yourself or another person who’s been burnt.

  • Stop the burning process as soon as possible. This may mean removing the person from the area, dousing flames with water, or smothering flames with a blanket. Do not put yourself at risk of getting burnt as well.
  • Remove any clothing or jewelry near the burnt area of skin, including babies’ nappies. But do not try to remove anything that’s stuck to the burnt skin, as this could cause more damage.
  • Cool the burn with cool or lukewarm running water for 20 minutes as soon as possible after the injury. Never use ice, iced water, or any creams or greasy substances like butter.
  • Keep yourself or the person warm. Use a blanket or layers of clothing, but avoid putting them on the injured area. Keeping warm will prevent hypothermia, where a person’s body temperature drops below 35C (95F). This is a risk if you’re cooling a large burnt area, particularly in young children and elderly people.
  • Cover the burn with cling film. Lay the cling film over the burn, rather than wrapping it around a limb. A clean, clear plastic bag can be used for burns on your hand.
  • Treat the pain from a burn with paracetamol or ibuprofen. Always check the manufacturer’s instructions when using over-the-counter medication. Children under 16 years of age should not be given aspirin.
  • Raise the affected area, if possible. This will help to reduce swelling.

When to go to the hospital

Once you have taken these steps, you’ll need to decide whether further medical treatment is necessary. 

Go to a hospital accident and emergency ( A & E ) department for:

  • large burns bigger than the size of the affected person’s hand
  • deep burns of any size that cause white or charred skin
  • burns on the face, neck, hands, feet, joints, or genitals
  • all chemical and electrical burns
  • any other injuries that need treating
  • any signs of shock  symptoms include cold, clammy skin, sweating, rapid, shallow breathing, and weakness or dizziness

You should also go to the hospital if you or the person who has been burned:

  • is under the age of 10
  • has a medical condition, such as heart, lung, or liver disease, or diabetes
  • has a weakened immune system (the body’s defense system) – for example, because of HIV or AIDS, or because they’re having chemotherapy for cancer

If someone has breathed in smoke or fumes, they should also get medical attention at the hospital. Some symptoms may be delayed, and can include:

  • coughing
  • a sore throat
  • difficulty breathing
  • singed nasal hair
  • facial burns

You should also go to A&E if you have been injured intentionally, or think someone has been injured intentionally.

Electrical burns

Electrical burns may not look serious, but they can be very damaging. Someone who has an electrical burn should seek immediate medical attention at an A&E department.

If the person has been injured by a low-voltage source (up to 220 to 240 volts), such as a domestic electricity supply, safely switch off the power supply or remove the person from the electrical source using a material that doesn’t conduct electricity, such as a wooden stick or a wooden chair.

Do not approach a person who’s connected to a high-voltage source (1,000 volts or more).

Also Read: Types of electrical injuries

Acid and chemical burns

Acid and chemical burns can be very damaging and require immediate medical attention at an A&E department.

If possible, find out what chemical caused the burn and tell the healthcare professionals at A&E.

If you’re helping someone else, put on appropriate protective clothing, such as gloves, and then:

  • remove any contaminated clothing on the person
  • if the chemical is dry, brush it off their skin
  • use running water to remove any traces of the chemical from the burnt area

Also Read: Tips for Chemical spills Preparation and Incident Response

Sunburn

Follow this advice for sunburn:

  • If you notice any signs of sunburn, such as hot, red, and painful skin, move into the shade or preferably inside.
  • Take a cool bath or shower for 10 minutes to cool down the burnt area of skin.
  • Apply aftersun lotion to the affected area to moisturize, cool, and soothe it. Don’t use greasy or oily products.
  • If you have any pain, paracetamol or ibuprofen should help relieve it. Always read the manufacturer’s instructions and do not give aspirin to children under the age of 16.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water.
  • Watch out for signs of heat exhaustion or heatstroke, where the temperature inside your body rises to 37 to 40C (98.6 to 104F) or above. Symptoms include dizziness, a rapid pulse, or vomiting.

If a person with heat exhaustion is taken to a cool place quickly, given water to drink, and has their clothing loosened, they should start to feel better within half an hour.

If they don’t, they could develop heatstroke. This is a medical emergency and you’ll need to call 999 for an ambulance.

Also Read: Sunglasses Safety and Eye Health

Download the Infographic

Now you can download the Infographic ” First Aid for burns” and post it at the workplace to communicate with everyone to be familiar with the treatment and first Aids shall be taken in case of any burns

Also Read: First aid requirements at construction site


Photo of the day: First Aid for burns

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